Music News
4:11 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

LA's Own 'Amazing And Unique Instrument' Turns 10

An Angeleno revels at 10 Times The Party, a celebration of Walt Disney Concert Hall's 10th Anniversary, on Oct. 5 in Los Angeles.
David Livingston Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 11:23 am

If you were listening to NPR 10 years ago this week, you might have heard this enthusiastic proclamation: "The wait is finally over for architect Frank Gehry, for the musicians and staff of the LA Philharmonic, and for all of Los Angeles. Tonight, for the first time in public, the orchestra plays its magnificent new instrument: Walt Disney Concert Hall."

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Sports
4:10 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

Pitching Like It's 1860, Teams Play Ball With Vintage Flair

The Essex Base Ball Organization, a vintage baseball league, holds its games on a farm in Newburyport, Mass.
Edgar B. Herwick III for NPR

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 2:54 am

The Red Sox square off against the Detroit Tigers at Fenway Park on Saturday in Game Six of the American League Championship Series. Forty miles north, another league is putting the finishing touches on its season.

This particular brand of baseball comes with a curious twist.

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

When U.S. Leaves After 12 Years, What's Next For Afghanistan?

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:04 pm

Journalist Kevin Sites reported from Afghanistan when the United States invaded in 2001, and he has been back a handful of times. With U.S. and NATO troops scheduled to withdraw next year, Sites calls the American legacy "a paradox." While many Afghans appreciate improvements in infrastructure facilitated by the U.S., the people running the government are "still the warlords," says Sites.

NPR Story
4:05 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

NHL Concussions Cast Spotlight On Head Injuries And Hockey

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:04 pm

While the NFL has been under a microscope for its handling of head injuries, professional hockey also has been dealing with high-profile concussions. Perhaps the league's best player, Sidney Crosby of the Pittsburgh Penguins, has missed large stretches of play after concussions. And this year, the season's first eight days left three players sidelined with concussions. The Mayo Clinic's Aynsley Smith discusses head injuries and hockey, including the role that fist fighting plays in the professional ranks.

NPR Story
4:05 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

It's Four O'Clock (In The Morning) Somewhere

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 5:04 pm

A new website devoted to pop cultural references to 4 a.m. is itself gaining a bit of pop culture status. John Rives, who created the site and calls himself an expert on the "worst possible hour" of the day, tells NPR that even Shakespeare invoked 4 a.m. (in four different plays).

Author Interviews
4:05 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

'The Book of Jezebel': An Honest Look At 'Lady Things'

Courtesy of Grand Central Publishing

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 3:02 pm

The website Jezebel takes a unique approach to women's media — focusing on politics, entertainment and advocacy issues typically absent from so-called beauty magazines.

Now the site is making its first foray onto the bookshelves with The Book of Jezebel: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Lady Things.

"I've been calling it an illustrated encyclopedia of the world," Jezebel founder Anna Holmes says. Holmes edited the new book, and warns NPR's Arun Rath that the volume isn't intended to be comprehensive.

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The Two-Way
2:23 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

JPMorgan Strikes Tentative $13B Mortgages Settlement

JP Morgan Chase & Company headquarters in New York.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 4:28 pm

In what would be the largest such settlement in U.S. history, JPMorgan Chase & Co. has reportedly reached a tentative deal with the Justice Department that would see the bank pay $13 billion to settle civil charges related to wrongdoing by some of its units just before and during the housing crisis.

The deal, sources tell news outlets including NPR, would not absolve JPMorgan from possible criminal liability.

Word of the tentative agreement emerged around 3 p.m. ET. Saturday. We posted when the news broke and followed with background and more details.

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The Two-Way
1:37 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

Violin Said To Have Been On The Titanic Sells For $1.6M

This violin is said to have been played by bandmaster Wallace Hartley during the final moments before the sinking of the Titanic. It's thought he put the instrument in that leather case. Hartley's body and the case were found by a ship that responded to the disaster. Now the violin has been sold.
Peter Muhly AFP/Getty Images

An anonymous buyer on Saturday paid about $1.6 million for a violin believed to have been played by one of the musicians who famously stayed aboard as the Titanic sank in the icy waters of the North Atlantic in April 1912.

The Associated Press writes that "the sea-corroded instrument, now unplayable, is thought to have belonged to bandmaster Wallace Hartley, who was among the disaster's more than 1,500 victims."

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The Two-Way
11:18 am
Sat October 19, 2013

190-Plus Nations In 23 Years For World's 'Most Traveled' Man

Mike Spencer Bown in Mogadishu, Somalia, in December 2010.
Mustafa Abdi AFP/Getty Images

Mike Spencer Bown's latest Facebook post has him in Cork, Ireland, which means he isn't quite finished wandering the world.

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The Two-Way
9:30 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Shedding Stereotypes, More Librarians Show Us Their Tats

Jennifer Galpern, August
Kate Fischer Rhode Island Library Association

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 12:56 pm

Is it their love of ink?

There seems to be something about tattoos that appeals to quite a few librarians.

Back in 2009 there was the Texas Library Association's "Tattooed Ladies of TLA" calendar that raised money for libraries damaged by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

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