Politics
4:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Message To Congress In One Georgia District: Don't Back Down

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Both sides have gone to great lengths to make one thing clear, while they're talking, they're not yet compromising. That's because many lawmakers don't want to. For House members backed by the Tea Party who come from strongly Republican districts support is high for taking a hard line.

NPR's Don Gonyea visited one district this week. It's in the northwest corner of Georgia, and it's home to Congressman Tom Graves. He was elected in 2010 and has helped lead the movement to defund the health care law.

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Technology
4:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Shutting Down Government Websites Is No Small Endeavor

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

One of the side effects of the government shutdown is the closure of many federal websites. The big ones, like the IRS and the White House, are still up and running. But there are others that have shut down, such as those of NASA or the Library of Congress. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports that while shutting the sites is likely to save money in the short run, it could create hassles down the road.

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Sports
4:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Remembering One Of Boxing's Storied Bouts

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

One final note on that famous title fight between Liston and Ali. The legendary anchor punch that Mike mentioned is also known as the phantom punch. That's because many in the crowd didn't see it land and certainly didn't think that one quick punch could have dropped a man Liston's size. Even Ali seemed surprised. To this day, many wonder if the fight was fixed. After the fight, Ali headed over to broadcaster Steve Ellis and asked to see a replay.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED AUDIO)

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Middle East
4:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Peace Prize Winners Want To Rid The World Of Chemical Weapons

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

This year's Nobel Peace Prize goes to the international chemical weapons watchdogs now on the ground in Syria. The group has been working for a decade and a half to get rid of some of the world's deadliest weapons. Its latest mission is also its most dangerous, documenting and disposing of the Syrian government's stockpiles in an active war zone.

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Middle East
4:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Syrians React To Peace Prize Winners With Skepticism

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Today's Nobel announcement was hailed in Washington and other Western capitals, but many Syrians say the prize hardly brings peace, as NPR's Deborah Amos reports from Beirut.

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Movie Reviews
4:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Captain Phillips': High Stakes On The High Seas

In the emotionally fraught thriller Captain Phillips, Tom Hanks plays the real-life freighter captain whose Maersk Alabama was overtaken by Somali pirates in 2009.
Columbia Pictures

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:38 pm

Before seeing Paul Greengrass' nerve-wracking, based-on-fact thriller Captain Phillips, I'd never been able to get my head around the logistics of Somali piracy. Enormous commercial freighters, captured and held for ransom by tiny bands of pirates — often teenagers — who always seem to overtake the freighters on the high seas in fishing skiffs smaller than the freighters' lifeboats.

I mean, you wonder: How on earth could four or five teenagers capture a freighter, subduing a far larger crew and extracting millions of dollars in ransom?

Wonder no more.

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What Comes Next? Conversations On The Afterlife
4:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Heaven Is Waiting; Hell Is A Different Question, Nun Says

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:38 pm

Perhaps it's no surprise that Mary Catherine Hilkert, a Catholic theologian, a professor at Notre Dame and a Dominican Sister of Peace, believes that people can find love, mercy and union with God after death. In her eyes, however, the concept of hell is far less definitive.

As part of All Things Considered's series on the concept of life after death, Hilkert spoke with host Robert Siegel about her perspectives on heaven and hell, why she thinks of banquets when she imagines the afterlife and why people hold such strong beliefs about what happens when life ends.

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Code Switch
4:22 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

'Fetch Clay, Make Man': Ali, Fetchit And The 'Anchor Punch'

In 1965, Muhammad Ali and Lincoln Perry (Stepin Fetchit) teamed up in pursuit of a legendary boxing technique: the anchor punch.
Courtesy of New York Theatre Workshop

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:38 pm

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Muhammad Ali's first title defense, a first-round TKO of Sonny Liston in 1965, propelled Ali to the status of icon. In Ali's training camp before the fight was an icon from an earlier era: Lincoln Perry. He was the first African-American movie star, who went by the stage name Stepin Fetchi. The relationship between the two men is the subject of an off-Broadway play called Fetch Clay, Make Man.

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The Two-Way
3:59 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Peter Higgs Learned About His Nobel From A Former Neighbor

British physicist Peter Higgs.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:07 pm

The notoriously shy Peter Higgs learned that he had been awarded the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday from a former neighbor.

In a press conference on Friday, the British theoretical physicist said he had tried to skip town on Tuesday, but instead ended up at a restaurant to have beer and soup. The Nobel Prize Committee in Stockholm tried to call Higgs shortly before they made the announcement, but Higgs does not have a cellphone.

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Education
3:31 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Pledge Of Allegiance Past Its Prime?

Millions of American school children begin the day with the pledge of allegiance. But do they, or their teachers, really understand what it means? Host Michel Martin discusses the issue with journalist Mary Plummer, of KPCC, and Peter Levine, director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement.

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