Environment
1:56 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Whatever Happened To The Deal To Save The Everglades?

Mechanical harvesters cut sugar cane on U.S. Sugar Corp. land in Clewiston, Fla., in 2008, the same year the state struck a deal to buy most of the company's Everglades holdings.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 10:49 am

South of Florida's Lake Okeechobee, hundreds of thousands of acres of sugar cane thrive in the heart of one of the world's largest wetlands. The Everglades stretches from the tip of the peninsula to central Florida, north of Lake Okeechobee.

"The Everglades actually begins at Shingle Creek, outside of Orlando," says Jonathan Ullman of the Sierra Club.

That's nearly 200 miles north of the agricultural land that Ullman and other environmentalists say is crucial to state and federal efforts to restore the wetlands area to a healthy ecosystem.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:54 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Verdi's Operas: A Vigorous Soundtrack To Human Nature

Giuseppe Verdi's operas have an uncanny ability to probe into our contemporary psyche.
Leemage Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 3:09 pm

Two hundred years ago today, in a small northern Italian village, a couple named Verdi — tavern owners by trade — welcomed the birth of a baby boy who would later change the face of opera forever. And, whether we recognize it or not, on the bicentennial of his birth, Giuseppe Verdi is still vital.

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The Record
11:03 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Mala Rodriguez And The Women Of Latin Hip-Hop

Mala Rodriguez on stage at the Mulafest Festival in Madrid in June.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

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It's All Politics
6:13 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Shutdown Diary: Paul Ryan's Plan Gets Tea Party Pushback

Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., offered a path forward in the fiscal stalemate, but Tea Party hard-liners weren't impressed.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Are House Republicans still seeking Democratic concessions on the Affordable Care Act? Or have they switched their sights to even bigger targets: federal spending on entitlements like Medicare and Social Security?

The answer on Wednesday depended on which Republican you asked.

Paul Ryan's Pitch

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It's All Politics
6:04 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

What To Call The Most Powerful Central Banker In The World

President Obama's nominee to lead the Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen, stands in the State Dining Room of the White House on Wednesday. If Yellen's nomination is confirmed by the Senate, she'll be the first woman to head the Federal Reserve System.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:10 pm

Janet Yellen got the official nod from President Obama Wednesday afternoon for the Fed's top spot. If Yellen's nomination is confirmed by the Senate, she'll be the first woman to head the Federal Reserve System and the most powerful central banker in the world.

But since she would be the first woman to get the job, just what exactly would her title be? Chair? Chairman? Chairwoman?

Yellen would replace Ben Bernanke, whose official salutation is chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

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The Two-Way
5:36 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Temporarily Closes

Homes sit next to the Exelon Bryon Nuclear Generating Stations in Bryon, Ill.
Jeff Haynes AFP/Getty Images

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which oversees the nation's one hundred nuclear reactors, has announced it will temporarily close its doors on Wednesday evening, due to the government shutdown. Safety operations will not be affected.

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The Two-Way
5:03 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Americans Prefer Hemorrhoids And Cockroaches To Congress

he U.S. Capitol is seen on November 19, 2011 in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 12:26 pm

We've known for years that Congress — as a whole — is unpopular.

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The Salt
4:53 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Fish For Dinner? Here Are A Few Tips For Sea Life Lovers

A fishmonger tosses a just-purchased fresh salmon to a colleague behind the counter at the Pike Place Fish Market in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 5:00 pm

If sustainability is a top priority when you're shopping at the fish counter, wild-caught seafood can be fraught with ethical complications.

One major reason why: bycatch, or the untargeted marine life captured accidentally by fishermen and, often, discarded dead in heaps. It's one of the most problematic aspects of industrial fishing.

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It's All Politics
4:53 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Obama Has A Tea Party Cousin — And He's Running For Senate

Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., and other senators rush to the floor for a vote in July. Roberts faces a 2014 primary challenge from a distant relative of President Obama's.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 7:14 pm

Another member of the Obama family wants to come to Washington. But don't expect the president to campaign for him.

Milton Wolf, a distant cousin of President Obama's, announced Tuesday he will run for the U.S. Senate in Kansas, challenging three-term Sen. Pat Roberts in the Republican primary.

There's some political distance between Wolf and his cousin in the White House, to put it mildly.

An outspoken critic of the president's health care law, Wolf writes a conservative column for the Washington Times and has made several appearances on Fox News.

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Shots - Health News
4:52 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Why Scientists Held Back Details On A Unique Botulinum Toxin

The botulism toxin comes from Clostridium botulinum bacteria, seen here in a colorized micrograph.
James Cavallini Science Source

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:51 pm

Scientists have discovered the first new form of botulinum toxin in over 40 years, but they're taking the unusual step of keeping key details about it secret.

That's because botulinum toxin is one of the most poisonous substances known. It causes botulism, and the newly identified form of it can't be neutralized by any available treatment.

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