Europe
6:29 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Three U.S. Economists Win Nobel Prize

Americans Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller won the Nobel prize for economics on Monday for developing new methods to study trends in asset markets.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the three had laid the foundation of the current understanding of asset prices.

While it's hard to predict whether stock or bond prices will go up or down in the short term, it's possible to foresee movements over periods of three years or longer, the academy said.

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Europe
5:37 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Man Leaves Wife Accidentally At Gas Station

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. If you've forgotten to replace the fuel cap at the gas station, you could do worse. A German man was driving back from his honeymoon in France. He pulled over to fuel up, thinking his bride, sleeping in the back seat, remained put. She actually got out to use the facilities. He drove on, and two and a half hours later, he noticed his wife was gone. The man called police, who said she was patiently waiting back at the gas station. This is probably not what she meant when she said, no better or for worse.

Around the Nation
5:24 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Chiefs Break Record For Loudest NFL Stadium

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Kansas City football fans broke the record yesterday for loudest stadium in the NFL. Fans of the Chiefs were recorded howling at over 137 decibels as the Chiefs defeated Oakland. Now, you may wonder just how loud 137 decibels is. That's considered beyond the threshold of pain, louder than a loud rock concert, almost as loud as a jet engine, and nearly as annoying as two soccer fans with vuvuzelas.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Analysis
3:43 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Shutdown In Day 14, Debt Ceiling Deadline Nears

Congress and the White House continue to work through the twin fiscal crises of funding for the federal government and the debt ceiling. Steve Inskeep and David Greene explore the dimensions of this massive political drama with Cokie Roberts, who weighs in on political topics most Mondays on Morning Edition, Robert Costa of the National Review, who's been following developments on Capitol Hill, and Terence Samuel of The Washington Post, who has been following public attitudes nationally.

Remembrances
3:39 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Pulitzer Prize Winner Oscar Hijuelos Dies At 62

Novelist Oscar Hijuelos was the first Latino writer to win the prize for fiction, for his second novel, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love. He died over the weekend at age 62. David Greene talks to author Gustavo Perez Firmat, who is a Columbia University professor and was a friend of Hijuelos.

Around the Nation
3:35 am
Mon October 14, 2013

State Dollars Reopen Federal Landmarks

When the government shut down, National Parks were closed. Now states are using their own money to open such treasures as Mount Rushmore, the Grand Canyon and the Statue of Liberty.

Asia
3:31 am
Mon October 14, 2013

China Experiences Surprise Drop In Exports

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a slide in Chinese exports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Chinese exports showed a surprise drop last month, according to government figures.

As NPR's Frank Langfitt reports, the September numbers underscore some of the challenges facing the world's second-largest economy.

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Economy
3:29 am
Mon October 14, 2013

U.S. Political Standoff Hangs Over IMF, World Bank Meetings

The world's top financial officials were in Washington, D.C. over the weekend for the annual meetings of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. The partial government shutdown and the debt ceiling standoff were hot topics among the visiting world financial leaders.

Business
3:21 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Research: 'Inner Speech' Can Be Disturbed By Chewing

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 3:53 am

Social science research shows movie goers are less receptive to ads if they're munching on popcorn. When we watch an ad on the screen, we subconsciously mouth the name we're hearing. And this "inner speech" makes an imprint on our brain. But if you're chewing your way through the ads, your mouth and brain don't go through those motions, and the message may not stay with you.

Around the Nation
3:21 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Shutdown Hinders S.D. Post-Blizzard Cleanup

Heavy and wet snow weighs down tree branches on the west side of Rapid City, S.D. Earlier this month, a fierce October snowstorm hit ranchers in the state hard.
Kristina Barker Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 7:58 am

A freak October blizzard earlier this month killed tens of thousands of cattle in South Dakota.

The number of animals is hard to confirm. In part, because the federal agency tasked with tallying livestock losses after a disaster is closed during the partial government shutdown.

October is often a great weather month to be in South Dakota, which is one reason why the early October blizzard caught so many off guard.

Todd Collins lost a fifth of his herd in this storm. "My dad is 80 years old, and he says he's never seen a killer storm the first of October."

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