Ecstatic Voices
1:03 am
Sat August 17, 2013

Sufi Mystics Get A Modern Soundtrack

Riad Abdel-Gawad creates new Sufi music by translating sacred chants to the violin.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:35 am

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The Two-Way
6:04 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Kyrgyz Officials Shut Down Alcohol-Smuggling Pipeline

A new pipeline between the Central Asian republics of Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan was until recently pumping away. Not oil, though — moonshine.

Customs and border officials in Kyrgyzstan uncovered the "makeshift underwater pipeline" on the bed of the Chu River, which divides the two countries. Officials think smugglers have sent thousands of liters of grain alcohol through the conduit from Kazakhstan.

The BBC writes:

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The Two-Way
6:00 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

N.J. Governor Gives Provisional OK to Medical Pot For Kids

Marijuana plants growing at a legal not-for-profit medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles last year.
David McNew Getty Images

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie agreed to ease restrictions on medical marijuana for chronically ill children, but he won't go as far as lawmakers would like.

NPR's Joel Rose reports that Christie, a Republican, has rejected part of a bill that would allow young patients access to an ingestible form of marijuana at state-approved dispensaries without the approval of a psychiatrist and pediatrician.

His partial veto sends the bill back to the Democratic-controlled Legislature for approval before it becomes law.

The Associated Press reports:

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Politics
5:22 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

In Rural N.C., New Voter ID Law Awakens Some Old Fears

Opponents of North Carolina's new voter ID legislation wear tape over their mouths while sitting in the gallery of the House chamber of the North Carolina General Assembly in Raleigh, N.C., on April 24, where lawmakers debated new voter laws. On Monday, Gov. Pat McCrory signed a new law that requires a state-approved photo ID to vote and cuts early-voting opportunities.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 7:51 pm

This week, North Carolina's governor signed a new law requiring a state-approved photo ID to cast a vote in a polling place and shortening the period for early voting. The move comes just weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court invalidated a key provision of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which had required large parts of the state to get federal approval before changing voting laws.

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Research News
5:22 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

N. America's Oldest Known Petroglyphs Discovered In Nevada

Courtesy of Larry Benson

Ancient North Americans gouged elaborate rock art into a heap of big boulders northeast of Reno, Nev., more than 10,000 years ago and perhaps 15,000 years ago. That makes the carvings the oldest known petroglyphs on the continent, according to a paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

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All Tech Considered
5:22 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Switching To Gmail May Leave Reporters' Sources At Risk

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:32 pm

In the digital world, almost everything you do to communicate leaves a trace. Often, emails are stored on servers even after they're deleted. Phone calls create logs detailing which numbers connected, when and for how long. Your mobile phone can create a record of where you are.

If you're a journalist trying to protect a confidential source, this is a very difficult world to work in.

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Shots - Health News
4:11 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

After These Docs Saw The Farm, They Didn't Want The City

A little doctoring away from it all can grow on a person.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 9:31 am

Finding doctors to work in the countryside isn't easy.

About 20 percent the U.S. population lives in rural areas, but only about 11 percent of doctors practice there. The lure of cities and suburbs has been hard to overcome. And doctor shortages, already acute in some rural areas, are expected to get worse.

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Latin America
4:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Peru's Natural Gas Rush Threatens Native Tribes, Again

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 10:15 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is one of the most critical tests for a developing economy: balancing development and the protection of human rights. It's currently playing out on the national stage in Peru. Several members of the president's cabinet have just resigned over plans to expand a gas field. It's in an area populated by tribes of Indians who have no contact with the outside world. Here's NPR's South America correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

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Planet Money
4:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

4 Reasons Subprime Loans Are Back (For Cars)

Rates may vary.
David Zalubowski AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:22 pm

"I wasn't even looking for a new car," Katrece Poole told me. But two years ago, a local car dealership running a direct-mail ad campaign sent her a letter saying they were making loans to lots of buyers. So she went down to the dealership, filled out the paperwork, and got approved — despite the fact that her car had been repossessed in 2005 because she missed payments.

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Business
4:03 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Internet-Based TV Service May Not Change The Cable Market

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 5:22 pm

The race to create a viable Internet-based TV service is on, and the contestants include the biggest names in computer technology: Apple, Microsoft, Intel and Google. Sony has apparently reached a deal — as preliminary — with Viacom to carry the company's cable channels on its planned web TV service.

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