The Two-Way
5:36 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Retired General Defends Himself Amid Leak Reports

Attorneys for former Joint Chiefs Vice Chairman Marine Gen. James Cartwright say it is "preposterous" to say he betrayed the United States. Here, Cartwright is seen during an announcement by President Obama, along with, from left, Defense Secretary Robert Gates, Vice President Joe Biden, and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.
Susan Walsh AP

Retired Marine Gen. James "Hoss" Cartwright, the former vice chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff who has reportedly been named as a target of a federal leak investigation, has issued a statement defending himself, saying that he did not betray the United States.

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It's All Politics
5:21 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Gun Group Aims To Stop Immigration Bill

Some gun-rights advocates see a threat to the Second Amendment in Congress' immigration overhaul plans.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 5:49 pm

What does an overhaul of the nation's immigration laws have to do with the Second Amendment right to own guns?

If you're the Gun Owners of America, everything.

The GOA, a smaller cousin of the National Rifle Association that often takes an even more aggressive approach, is branding the just-passed Senate immigration bill, with its path to citizenship for people in the country illegally, as an "anti-gun amnesty."

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The Two-Way
5:13 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Deadly Violence Hits Egypt In Clashes Over Morsi's Leadership

Opponents of Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi burn the contents of an office of the Freedom and Justice Party, an arm of the Muslim Brotherhood, in Alexandria Friday. Two people were reportedly killed in clashes in the city.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 7:02 pm

Two people have died in Alexandria, Egypt, where protests against President Mohammed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood have been building all week. Egyptian security officials say one of the dead is an American citizen. Dozens of people were wounded in the violence.

Update at 8 p.m. ET: Death Of U.S. Citizen Confirmed

"We can confirm that a U.S. citizen was killed in Alexandria, Egypt," State Department Press Office Director Patrick Ventrell said in a news release Friday evening.

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The Two-Way
4:36 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Highs Of 117 Expected In Las Vegas, In Dangerous Heat Wave

Excessive heat warnings will continue for much of the Desert Southwest through Monday. Here, Maria Wieser of Italy drinks water while sightseeing in Death Valley National Park on Friday.
Chris Carlson AP

A heat wave is broiling America's Southwest, where temperatures are expected to soar past 110 degrees in coming days. Before noon on Friday, temperatures in many parts of southeastern California, Nevada and Arizona had already topped 100 degrees.

An "excessive heat warning" was issued Friday by the National Weather Service, which blames the dangerously high temperatures on "a massive area of high pressure across the Western United States through Monday."

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The Summer of '63
4:21 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Bittersweet At No. 1: How A Japanese Song Topped The Charts In 1963

Underlying the sweetness of Kyu Sakamoto's unexpected hit song "Sukiyaki" was a story of sadness and loss.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 8:22 pm

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:21 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Police Take Different Approaches To 'The Tyranny Of 911'

Miami Public Service Aide Tatayana Harris enters information into her laptop after clearing an accident in Miami's Little Havana community. Harris has been a Miami Police PSA for five years and hopes to become a police officer.
Marsha Halper for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 8:22 pm

When the 911 phone system was established, it gave citizens a fast, easy way to reach police in an emergency.

But it also created a logistical challenge for law enforcement: Police departments get so many calls, 911 can be as much a burden as a boon. Many calls are non-emergencies, and responding can take police away from situations where they're really needed.

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Shots - Health News
3:51 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Administration Clarifies Insurance Rules For Contraceptives

The federal rules for coverage of birth control by religiously affiliated groups are becoming clear.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 5:41 pm

The Obama administration is moving to end a long-running controversy over making no-cost birth control available under the federal health law.

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Business
3:17 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Puerto Rico Rolling Out The Welcome Mat For Millionaires

Children play on a beach in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The Puerto Rican government hopes that convincing wealthy investors to relocate here will boost the island's economy.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 8:22 pm

A few weeks ago, Alberto Baco Bague arrived in New York for a roadshow of sorts. In just 48 hours, Baco, Puerto Rico's secretary of economic development and commerce, met with more than 30 hedge fund managers, investors and others who could be classified as very well-off.

His mission might seem quixotic at best: trying to convince these well-heeled New Yorkers to uproot themselves from Manhattan and relocate to Puerto Rico. But he says they are starting to come.

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Around the Nation
3:17 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Coming To An Airport Near You: Fluffy Stress Relief

Therapy dogs Barney (rear) and Hazel are on the job comforting weary travelers at LAX.
Gloria Hillard NPR

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 8:22 pm

Summer travel is in full swing, and that means crowded airports, flight delays and long security lines. To help calm weary travelers, some airports are turning to man's best friend.

San Jose's and Miami's international airports have therapy dog programs, and Los Angeles International Airport — ranked the second-most-stressful airport in the country last year — launched its own crew of comfort dogs this year.

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NPR Story
3:01 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

Election Laws Likely To Change Without Voting Rights Act

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 8:22 pm

The Supreme Court struck down a key part of the 1965 Voting Rights Act this week. The court said that the standard by which it is determined that some states need preapproval for making changes to voting laws was unconstitutional. So what does it mean for the Department of Justice and states that were affected by the law? Audie Cornish speaks with Bill Yeomans, law professor at American University.

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