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My Big Break
4:23 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

An Idea That Stuck: How A Hymnal Bookmark Helped Inspire The Post-It Note

3M employee Art Fry had a problem: When he sang with his church choir, his paper bookmarks were forever falling out of his hymnal. Thankfully for Fry, his coworker Spencer Silver had a new adhesive in the works.
Courtesy of 3M

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 5:32 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

For Spencer Silver, a retired chemist at 3M, his big break was the Post-it Note.

It all started when he stumbled on a new type of adhesive that used tiny microspheres.

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Goats and Soda
4:13 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Volunteer Recap: A Summer With Her Mind On The Toilet

An Ethiopian woman and her child stand next to an Arborloo latrine.
Courtesy of Dionna Fry

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 6:45 am

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NPR Story
4:12 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

How Is The Airline Industry Disrupted By Conflict Zones?

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 5:32 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music Interviews
4:11 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Eric Clapton And J.J. Cale: Notes On A Friendship

Eric Clapton's new album, The Breeze, honors the late J.J. Cale.
Brian Rooney Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 6:29 pm

There are, you could argue, two strands of Eric Clapton fans: those who love his scorching electric solos and groundbreaking fusions of blues and rock, and those who prefer his mellow, unplugged pop songs from later years. The two groups might just find common ground on his latest album.

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NPR Story
4:11 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Fighting Quickly Resumes As Cease-Fire Ends In Gaza

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 6:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:11 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

War In Syria Continues Among Other Regional Conflicts

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 5:21 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:11 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Exploring The Economics Of Paying What You Want

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 6:29 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
4:11 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Lessons In 'Essentialism': Getting More Out Of Life By Doing Less

Odin M. Eidskrem iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 5:32 pm

Greg McKeown doesn't believe in having it all or doing it all. In his new book Essentialism, he argues that we should pursue only those things that are truly important — and eliminate everything else.

"In the bigger picture essentialism is about fighting this nonsense that we have been sold ... that if we can fit it all in then we can have it all," he tells NPR's Eric Westervelt.

McKeown provides advice and real-life examples from people who revised their do-it-all approach. He says you don't have to say yes to everything in order to be successful.

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Movie Interviews
4:11 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Director Says Hoffman Inhabited 'Most Wanted Man' Role

Anton Corbijn directed Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his final roles — playing a haggard German intelligence agent in the film adaptation of the John le Carré spy thriller A Most Wanted Man.
Roadside Attractions

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 5:48 pm

When actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died of a heroin overdose in February, he left behind several unreleased films.

His most significant role: The haggard German intelligence agent Gunther Bachmann in the spy thriller A Most Wanted Man. Hoffman's character leads a fictional intelligence unit and is tasked with recruiting informants within the Islamic community to uncover terrorist plots.

The film is based on the 2008 John le Carré novel by the same name. It's set in Hamburg, Germany, more than 10 years after Sept. 11.

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Code Switch
4:11 pm
Sat July 26, 2014

Hoping To Reach A Wider Audience, Lifetime Breaks Out Of Familiar Formula

On Wednesday, Lifetime premiered BAPs, a reality show that follows "an exclusive, privileged and affluent group of African American friends from St. Louis who self-identify as 'BAPs' — Black American Princesses and Princes."
Richard Knapp

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 6:29 pm

TV viewers have come to expect a certain formula from Lifetime shows — stories of desperate women, sudden teen pregnancy, or sentimental romance — starring women who are, for the most part, white. But on Wednesday, Lifetime added something different to their lineup with the premiere of a new "docu-series" called BAPs. BAPs stands for Black American Prince or Princess. The reality show follows a group of young, wealthy African Americans in St. Louis through dinner parties and shouting matches.

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