KWIT

Ally Karsyn

Arts Producer/Announcer
Patti Strong
Ally Karsyn

I was standing on a platform waiting for Delta flight 642 to depart from Omaha with $2,600 in cash and whatever I could cram into a suitcase. I boarded the plane, found seat 23A and opened my notebook to fill its pages with a flood of emotions. A fresh start was just hours away.

Devon Cadwell
Ally Karsyn

When you first meet Devon Cadwell, he’ll ask, “What’s your favorite food?” And you can’t say pizza. After gushing about my love of Indian food (mmm, butter chicken), I got down to business and talked to the new-to-Sioux-City singer-songwriter about his upcoming performance and his sources of inspiration that include everything from Greek mythology to shoes.

Dwight Howe
Ally Karsyn

Dwight Howe is the cultural liaison and Omaha language Instructor for the St. Augustine Indian Mission in Winnebago, Nebraska. Dwight has been an educator and public speaker for over twenty years. He is an enrolled member of the Omaha Tribe.

Ode presents an evening of true stories, told live outside at Koffie Knechtion, 419 Golf Road, in South Sioux City at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23. Storytellers will share personal essays crafted around the theme "Just Work." Admission is $10.

Devon Cadwell
Ally Karsyn

 

   

For Devon Cadwell, a pair of shoddy shoes inspired a series of songs. By day, the local singer-songwriter is a therapist at Jackson Recovery Centers but, rather than drawing on his personal experiences, his mind wanders to make-believe world of lost love, ship captains and a runaway groom.

Francys Chavez
Ally Karsyn

    

1980. The war in El Salvador  was at its peak. Thousands of families  were separated and displaced all throughout the world. Among them was my father, a 16-year-old boy who came to know fear as a way of life. One night, actually the very last night that he ever spent in his country, a mass shooting took over the streets. My father, along with his siblings, hid under the bed, hoping that the bullets wouldn’t find them.

He lost two cousins that night. Growing weary of the violence, my grandparents asked my father to go and seek asylum in Mexico.

Jim Schaap
Ally Karsyn

Wilma walked with an odd aluminum cane, a clear plastic handle grip like a tricycle’s and a four-pronged base for stability. She was old and had always been too heavy. To pull through our front door—left foot up, then the cane, then right foot—was a major undertaking.

Her visits sometimes lingered a half-hour or so beyond “long enough” because once she had to think about pulling herself up from the kitchen chair she threatened, leaving seemed like too much work. So she sat there as if just getting in through the door merited an audience.

 

I was 37 weeks pregnant when I noticed my baby had all but stopped moving. At first, I thought maybe he’s just getting bigger and has less room, but something didn’t feel right. It was the day after Thanksgiving 2014, and I just stayed in bed. I didn’t want to get up because I knew, once I put my feet on the floor, the day was going to start and my life would never be the same.

Catch the first glimpse of the Sioux City Art Center's newest exhibition, "Sioux City Art Center Selects," a regional juried exhibition featuring the works of eight artists from Iowa and within 300 miles of Sioux City. A free Preview Opening Reception will take place 5-7 p.m. Friday with food and drinks. A gallery talk starts at 6 p.m.

Ally Karsyn

When I turned 18, I thought I knew it all. Everything about anything, and no one could change my mind or tell me any different. I didn’t go to college right out of high school. Working full-time and making money seemed like a better plan for me, at least until I could pick a major. My mom and stepfather told me that if I wasn’t going to college, I was going to have to pay rent to continue living at their house. They were going to charge me $135 a month. $135 a month? Yeah right, I thought. I’ll teach them and just move out.

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