KWIT

Camila Domonoske

Both the U.S and Uganda have called off the search for notorious warlord Joseph Kony and his followers, the Lord's Resistance Army, saying that Kony's power has dwindled to the point that he's no longer a threat.

The group carried out brutal murders, rapes and mutilations, and was known for kidnapping children and forcing them to become soldiers. Uganda has been battling Kony and his followers for decades, and U.S. Special Operations forces joined the search for the warlord in 2011.

A viral video in 2012 brought Kony international infamy.

Updated at 2:41 p.m. ET

An Egyptian-American aid worker and her Egyptian husband have returned to the U.S. after being imprisoned for nearly three years in Egypt, over charges of child abuse that were widely regarded as specious.

German federal prosecutors say the bombing of a soccer team's bus in Dortmund, Germany, was carried out by a man apparently attempting to manipulate the team's stock for profit. The 28-year-old man has been arrested and charged with attempted murder, among other things.

Three explosions went off near the Borussia Dortmund team bus on April 11, as it was pulling out of the hotel where the players were staying. One player was injured and needed surgery on his wrist.

Updated at 8:05 p.m. ET

One police officer is dead and two seriously wounded after a shooting on Paris' famous Champs Elysees, in an incident that left one attacker dead. The assailant reportedly targeted a police vehicle. Authorities say a bystander was also wounded.

French prosecutor Francois Molins said the authorities have identified the shooter and are assessing whether the attacker had accomplices. Raids and searches were ongoing, Molins said.

Updated at 6:00 p.m. ET

General Motors has stopped operations in Venezuela after its only plant there was illegally seized by authorities, the automaker says in a statement. The details are murky: Multiple employees at the plant tell NPR that they believe auto dealers, not government officials, were responsible for the takeover.

The seizure happened Wednesday, as the "mother of all protests" brought hundreds of thousands of people into the streets to demonstrate against socialist President Nicolas Maduro.

This Tax Day, former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer launched a new tool designed to make government spending and revenue more accessible to the average citizen.

The website — USAFacts.org — has been slow and buggy for users on Tuesday, apparently due to the level of traffic. It offers interactive graphics showing data on revenue, spending, demographics and program missions.

Vice President Pence, visiting Japan on his 10-day tour of Asia, said the U.S. has launched bilateral talks with Tokyo in the hopes of reaching a new trade agreement.

It was Pence's second stop on the trip, which will later take him to Australia and Indonesia. He previously visited South Korea, where he emphasized the Trump administration's "resolve" on the North Korean nuclear threat, a theme he revisited in Japan as well.

Trade was also a major topic of conversation.

A major interstate in Atlanta buckled dramatically on Monday, injuring a motorcyclist and shutting down a section of the freeway.

"The pavement rose to nearly the height of a full-grown man and split into several pieces," The Associated Press reports, citing multiple witnesses.

The injured motorcyclist was traveling at high speed along the interstate when the pavement began to buckle, the wire service reports. He hit the damaged section of highway and was "flung through the air"; he has been hospitalized in critical condition, the AP writes.

Kathrine Switzer, the first woman to officially enter the Boston Marathon, returned to the course 50 years after she made history — finishing in 2017 with a time of 4:44:31.

When Switzer ran in 1967, she was 20, and entered as "K.V. Switzer" — so none of the race organizers would know she was a woman. When she was discovered, after the marathon had already started, the race director tried to rip her bib numbers off her back.

Two Kenyan runners, both of them making their Boston Marathon debut, have won the prestigious race.

Edna Kiplagat, a Kenyan policewoman and two-time world champion marathoner, finished first in the women's race with a time of 2:21:52. Rose Chelimo, a Kenyan-born Bahraini runner, placed second.

Geoffrey Kirui, also of Kenya, won the mens' race at 2:09:37 — his first-ever marathon victory. He edged out Portland runner Galen Rupp by 21 seconds.

It was a big day for debut runners at Boston, according to Runner's World.

Pages