Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Reality Winner, the former NSA contractor accused of leaking classified documents to a news site last summer, has accepted a bargain with prosecutors and pleaded guilty in federal court.

Winner, 26, was charged with violating the Espionage Act. She was accused of leaking documents that described Russian efforts to penetrate American election systems.

Her plea bargain calls for her to serve 5 years and 3 months in prison, with 3 years' supervised release, Georgia Public Broadcasting's Stephen Fowler reports. The deal still needs to be approved by a judge.

Remember the Ecce Homo, the notorious, well-intentioned, poorly realized "restoration" of a fresco of Jesus in the town of Borja?

A group of craftsmen in Estella, Spain, seems to have missed out on the cautionary tale.

"It has happened again," El País solemnly intoned.

Brendan Dassey, who was found guilty of assisting in a 2005 murder in Wisconsin on the basis of a confession that his lawyers say was coerced, will not be getting his case reconsidered by the Supreme Court.

Dassey's case was featured in a Netflix documentary called Making a Murderer, which cast doubt on the validity of his conviction, as well as that of his uncle, Steven Avery.

Over the past two years, a lower court and a three-judge panel of an appeals court both found that Dassey's confession was involuntary and that he should be released.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

In the past 14 months, Algeria has either expelled or turned away more than 13,000 migrants and forced them to walk into the Sahara, according to a new report by The Associated Press.

Kandace Vallejo thought she knew Southwest Key Programs: a big nonprofit based in Austin, Texas. Runs a charter school. Works with youth.

And holds thousands of migrant children in facilities paid for by the U.S. government.

That was news.

Study after study has found that partisan beliefs and bias shape what we believe is factually true.

Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET Wednesday

Since early May, 2,342 children have been separated from their parents after crossing the Southern U.S. border, according to the Department of Homeland Security, as part of a new immigration strategy by the Trump administration that has prompted widespread outcry.

On Wednesday, President Trump signed an executive order reversing his policy of separating families — and replacing it with a policy of detaining entire families together, including children, but ignoring legal time limits on the detention of minors.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

With chants of "families united" and "free our children now," hundreds of people marched to the tent city in Tornillo, Texas, where children have been detained for immigration violations.

The Father's Day march near El Paso was primarily organized by Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas, who is also running for Senate against Ted Cruz. He says the march was the brainchild of Veronica Escobar, who is running to fill his seat in the House, as well as other community leaders.

Italian prosecutors dropped a sexual harassment case against a powerful sports executive, in part because they believed his alleged victim was too old to be intimidated, according to reporting by The Guardian and The New York Times.

Carlo Tavecchio — the former head of the Italian soccer federation, who stepped down last year after Italy was eliminated from the World Cup — is accused of groping and attempting to kiss female soccer executive Elisabetta Cortani in his office in 2015.

The Afghan government and the Taliban have begun a rare three-day cease-fire in honor of Eid al-Fitr, the Muslim holiday marking the end of Ramadan.

The cessation in hostilities is actually two separate, unilateral cease-fires — one by the government, which began earlier this week and is expected to last about a week, and an overlapping three-day cease-fire by the Taliban.

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