KWIT

Camila Domonoske

The U.S. team won the Women's World Cup soccer final 5-2 in a game that brought U.S. fans to their feet, reduced polished sportswriters to all-caps expressions of awe and rewrote FIFA records — and that was just in the first half.

The game began in spectacular fashion: In the first five minutes, captain Carli Lloyd scored two swift goals — the fastest two goals in FIFA history, according to the FIFA Women's World Cup Twitter account.

Just a few minutes later, Lauren Holiday brought the score up to 3-0.

Nearly 500 people were injured at a water park in Taiwan after an explosion at a music event caused a fire to break out Saturday night.

The fire started during an evening rap performance in New Taipei City, NPR's Frank Langfitt, reporting from Shanghai, tells our Newscast unit. The accident at Formosa Fun Coast was caught on cellphone video.

"At one point, green powder shot out from the stage over the audience," Frank says. "The powder quickly ignited, enveloping fans. Some people staggered around on fire, while others collapsed to the ground."

Updated at 8:50 p.m. EDT

U.S. airstrikes in Libya have killed Algerian militant Mokhtar Belmokhtar, who led the 2013 attack on an Algerian gas plant that killed at least 38 foreign hostages.

Two Pentagon officials confirm that U.S. airstrikes killed Belmokhtar. The Libyan government also released a statement confirming his death.

The Fun Home had a fun night at the 2015 Tonys: the musical, based on Alison Bechdel's graphic memoir, won not only best musical but best book, best original score, best direction of a musical and best performance by an actor in a leading role in a musical.

It took nearly four decades, but a horse has once again attained the honor that some call the most difficult achievement in sports: American Pharoah, after winning the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes, ran to victory in the Belmont Stakes as well.

He's the first Triple Crown winner since 1978. With his win, a total of 12 horses have now achieved the feat.

American Pharoah took the lead early in the mile-and-a-half long race, with Frosted close on his tail. From there, the colt never gave up the front position.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has broken his leg in a bike crash outside of Geneva, the State Department has confirmed.

"Secretary Kerry broke his right femur in a bicycling accident this morning in Scionzier, France," State Department spokesman John Kirby says.

Updated at 7 p.m. EDT

Amtrak will be restoring rail service between Philadelphia and New York at 5:30 Monday morning, the rail service announced Sunday.

Service between the two cities had been shut down since Tuesday, when train 188 derailed in Philadelphia, killing eight and wounding more than 200.

The affected section of track is part of the Northeast Corridor — the busiest railroad in America.

American Pharoah is the king of the nation's horse races this month: in a driving rain, the Kentucky Derby winner took home top prize at the Preakness Stakes Saturday.

Ridden by Victor Espinoza, he left the other horses at Pimlico Race Course eating his mud; with an unofficial time of 1:58.46, he led by an impressive seven lengths.

If he can win the Belmont Stakes on June 6, he'll be the first Triple Crown winner since 1978.

Updated 4 a.m. ET Monday:

NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports: Organizers of the contests for cartoons and caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad had hired 40 off-duty police and security officers — including some members of local SWAT teams — in anticipation of the possibility of trouble. The evening, billed as a free-speech promotion, was nearing its end when two unidentified men drove up to the building and opened fire, wounding a security guard in the leg. The assailants were engaged immediately by law enforcement in a gunfight and shot dead in the parking lot.

American Pharoah, ridden by Victor Espinoza, has won the 141st Kentucky Derby with a time of 2:03:02.

He raced to victory before the largest Derby crowd ever — 170,513, reports The Associated Press.

American Pharoah, owned by Ahmed Zayat, was the favorite heading into the race at Churchill Downs in Louisville. He had to fight Firing Line and Dortmund for the victory; the three were neck-and-neck (and neck) for a stretch, but American Pharoah pulled ahead at the end. Firing Line came in second.

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