Corey Flintoff

Corey Flintoff is NPR's international correspondent based in Moscow. His journalism career has taken him to more than 50 countries, most recently to cover the civil war in Libya, the revolution in Egypt and the war in Afghanistan.

After joining NPR in 1990, Flintoff worked for many years as a newscaster during All Things Considered. In 2005, he became part of the NPR team covering the Iraq War, where he embedded with U.S. military units fighting insurgents and hunting roadside bombs.

Flintoff's reporting from Iraq includes stories on sectarian killings, government corruption, the Christian refugee crisis and the destruction of Iraq's southern marshes. In 2010, he traveled to Haiti to report on the massive earthquake its aftermath. Two years before, he reported on his stint on a French warship chasing pirates off the coast of Somalia.

One of Flintoff's favorite side jobs at NPR is standing in for Carl Kasell during those rare times when the venerable scorekeeper takes a break from Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Before NPR, Flintoff served as the executive producer and host of Alaska News Nightly, a daily news magazine produced by the Alaska Public Radio Network in Anchorage. His coverage of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill was recognized with the 1989 Corporation for Public Broadcasting Award.

In 1977, Flintoff got his start in public radio working at at KYUK-AM/TV, in Bethel, Alaska. KYUK is a bilingual English-Yup'ik Eskimo station and Flintoff learned just enough Yup'ik to announce the station identification. He wrote and produced a number of television documentaries about Alaskan life, including "They Never Asked Our Fathers" and "Eyes of the Spirit," which have aired on PBS and are now in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution.

He tried his hand at commercial herring fishing, dog-mushing, fiction writing and other pursuits, but failed to break out of the radio business.

Flintoff has a bachelor's degree from the University of California at Berkeley and a master's degree from the University of Chicago, both in English literature. In 2011, he was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from Drexel University.

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World
4:27 am
Mon July 21, 2014

International Observers Work To Keep Tabs On Site Of Malaysia Jet Crash

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 7:30 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Secretary of State John Kerry spent a lot of time on TV yesterday, laying out what he says is extraordinary circumstantial evidence that rebels in Eastern Ukraine shot down the Malaysia Airlines jetliner. Kerry said on NBC's "Meet The Press" they did it with Russian help.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "MEET THE PRESS")

SECRETARY OF STATE JOHN KERRY: It is clear that Russia supports the separatists, supplies the separatists, encourages the separatists, trains the separatists and Russia needs to step up and make a difference here.

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Parallels
4:03 pm
Fri July 18, 2014

The Challenges Of Investigating The Malaysia Airlines Disaster

Ukrainian coal miners search the crash site of the Malaysia Airlines plane near the eastern village of Rozsypne. The area is under the control of pro-Russian separatists who are fighting the Ukrainian government.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Fri July 18, 2014 6:54 pm

The crash site of the Malaysia Airlines flight in eastern Ukraine holds many important clues about what happened to the plane. But that site is under the control of pro-Russian separatists who are suspected of involvement in shooting the plane down.

The rebel fighters say they are giving access to investigators, including those from the Ukrainian government, though one Ukrainian official who visited the scene Friday said he was not given full access.

Here are some of the key questions on the investigation into Flight MH17:

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Europe
4:18 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

Darkened By A Bloody History, Baltics Hope To Be Bolstered By NATO

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 6:23 pm

Russia's recent involvement in Ukrainian political turmoil touched a raw nerve in the Baltic countries of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. All three are now members of the EU and NATO, but they have painful memories of the Soviet occupation. Leaders of the Baltic states are asking for a bigger NATO presence in their countries, a move Russia angrily opposes.

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Europe
4:05 am
Mon July 14, 2014

Russia's Annexation Of Crimea Worries Baltic Nation Of Latvia

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 11:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Russia gave a reason when it annexed the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine. Russian President Vladimir Putin said he was protecting Russian-speaking people. Two members of NATO also have a large ethnic Russian populations - Latvia and Estonia - wonder if they are next in line for Russian interference. NPR's Corey Flintoff spoke with some Latvians.

COREY FLINTOFF, BYLINE: This is what Putin said when he annexed Crimea.

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Europe
5:21 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Fighting In Eastern Ukraine Is Described As Fierce But Indecisive

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 6:52 am

Diplomats are trying to arrange a new ceasefire in eastern Ukraine. But Ukraine's president is under domestic pressure to take decisive military action against pro-Russian separatists.

Europe
3:25 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

In Long-Roiled Ukraine, War Mentality Turns Outward

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 6:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Ukrainian military ramped up air and artillery strikes against pro-Russian separatists today. The offensive in Ukraine's eastern provinces resumed after President Petro Poroshenko declared he would not renew a 10-day ceasefire. Russian President Vladimir Putin said Moscow would protect the interests of ethnic Russians in other countries but he didn't offer a specific support to the rebels in Ukraine. Here's NPR's Corey Flintoff.

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Europe
3:07 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Ukraine's Latest Turn Toward EU Has Moscow Glowering

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 5:33 pm

Ukraine's president has signed a historic trade and economic pact with the European Union, a move his predecessor rejected. The conflict that the first rejection sparked still simmers, with violence continuing in the country's east despite a shaky cease-fire.

Europe
4:24 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Refugees From Eastern Ukraine Wonder When They Can Go Home

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 6:59 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When Ukraine's former president refused to sign a trade agreement with the European Union, he was driven from office. Today in Brussels, Ukraine's new president signed that deal, as did the former Soviet Republics of Georgia and Moldova. Russia still objects and fighting between Ukrainian forces and Russian separatists goes on. The violence has forced thousands of people in eastern Ukraine from their homes. NPR's Corey Flintoff spoke with some of them.

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Europe
3:12 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Ukrainian Rebels Reject Cease-Fire, As Russian Troops Line Border

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 6:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Europe
3:22 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

From Ukraine's President, A Promise Of Truce — With Conditions

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 6:08 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Ukraine's new president says he will order a unilateral cease-fire in the East of his country. That's where government troops have been fighting pro-Russian separatists. The announcement today came after Petro Poroshenko discussed the crisis with Russian President Vladimir Putin. NPR's Corey Flintoff has this update from the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk.

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