Tailgating for Our Kids

Gretchen talk with Aaron Beutler, community outreach director at the Boys and Girls Home and Family Services Inc., about the annual fundraiser Tailgating for our Kids, happening tonight at the Marina Center.
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Vice President Joe Biden isn't running for president — not yet, anyway. But a group hoping he does is going on air with a six-figure ad buy encouraging him to get in the race.

Waking up early on a Saturday. Sharpened No. 2 pencils and a calculator. For teenagers headed to a four-year college, taking a standardized entrance exam such as the ACT and SAT is typically a requirement. But it's far from a universal experience.

A Muslim pop culture website: the idea seemed so obvious, Zainab Khan waited years for someone else to make one. A place for jokes about nosy aunties, sharing hijab hacks and Ramadan recipes, and advice on navigating Minder (yup, there's a Muslim Tinder).

In creative writing workshops, one maxim often gets passed around — so often, in fact, it can take on the weight of a commandment: "Show, don't tell." The idea, of course, is to convey emotion by depicting only what's happening, and to keep from spelling things out too much.

Kenzaburo Oe, it appears, has little regard for that advice.

Their work details how cells repair damaged DNA and preserve genes. And now three scientists — Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar – have won the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Their work promises years of better treatment and better drugs.

The three researchers carried out their work separately, unearthing different mechanisms cells use to fix problems in a range of cells.

Lindahl, born in 1938, is a Swedish citizen; Modrich, born in 1946, is a U.S. citizen — as is Sancar, who is also a citizen of Turkey. Like Modrich, he was born in 1946.

Renoir Haters Protest In Boston

1 hour ago
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California Governor Approves Law Targeting Wage Gap

1 hour ago

California Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a gender wage equality law that his office says is among the strongest in the nation.

"Sixty-six years after passage of the California Equal Pay Act, many women still earn less money than men doing the same or similar work," Brown said. "This bill is another step toward closing the persistent wage gap between men and women."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


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We hope to raise $65,000 to support Siouxland Public Media, local public radio

The on-air Fall Friendraiser will air October 22nd through 28th

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