Africa
3:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Kidnapped Libyan Prime Minister Freed By Captors

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

The Libya State News Agency has announced Prime Minister Ali Zeidan has been freed. Earlier it was reported that gunmen kidnapped him from a hotel in Tripoli where he resides. The abduction came amid anger among Libya's powerful Islamic militant groups over the U.S. special forces raid that seized a Libyan al-Qaida suspect.

Middle East
3:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

U.S. Delays Egyptian Aid Over Democracy Issue

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When Egypt's democratically-elected president was ousted from power, there was a lot of speculation that the United States might cut off some, if not all, aid to that country. And now the Obama administration has told the interim government in Egypt that it's holding up hundreds of millions of dollars. The message from the United States boils down to this: No Apache helicopters until you can show you're getting back on a path to democracy. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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Middle East
3:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Aid Workers: Syrian Refugees Unable To Help Their Kids Cope

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:09 am

For two and a half years, Syria has been at war with millions of civilians on the move. U.N. agencies tracking the exodus say about three quarters of the children forced to flee their homes are under the age of 11. A team of child psychologists in Amman, Jordan, make house calls to address the needs of families who do not live in refugee camps.

Planet Money
2:00 am
Thu October 10, 2013

What A U.S. Default Would Mean For Pensions, China And Social Security

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:38 am

What would happen if Congress doesn't raise the debt ceiling and the U.S. defaults on its debt later this month? The broad economic implications are unpredictable, but a default could cause huge trouble for the global economy.

But whatever happens to the global economy, one thing is clear: People all over the world who have loaned the U.S. government money won't get paid on time.

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Arts & Life
1:58 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: On Heroism

Daily Beast Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown
Victoria Will The Daily Beast

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

Tina Brown, editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, joins NPR's Steve Inskeep again for a recurring feature Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth. This month her suggestions are all about heroes — whether being heroic means doing something, or not doing something.

Revisiting Black Hawk Down

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Business
1:56 am
Thu October 10, 2013

When It Comes To Jobs, Not All Small Businesses Make It Big

Sweetgreen co-founders Nathaniel Ru (from left), Jonathan Neman and Nicolas Jammet at the opening of a Virginia location last year.
Courtesy of Sweetgreen

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 3:38 pm

Part of a series about small businesses in America

When it comes to job creation, politicians talk about small businesses as the engines of the U.S. economy. It's been a familiar refrain among politicians from both major parties for years.

But it obscures the economic reality. It makes a nice slogan, but it's not really accurate to say that small businesses produce most of the nation's new jobs, says John Haltiwanger, an economics professor at the University of Maryland.

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Environment
1:56 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Whatever Happened To The Deal To Save The Everglades?

Mechanical harvesters cut sugar cane on U.S. Sugar Corp. land in Clewiston, Fla., in 2008, the same year the state struck a deal to buy most of the company's Everglades holdings.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 10:49 am

South of Florida's Lake Okeechobee, hundreds of thousands of acres of sugar cane thrive in the heart of one of the world's largest wetlands. The Everglades stretches from the tip of the peninsula to central Florida, north of Lake Okeechobee.

"The Everglades actually begins at Shingle Creek, outside of Orlando," says Jonathan Ullman of the Sierra Club.

That's nearly 200 miles north of the agricultural land that Ullman and other environmentalists say is crucial to state and federal efforts to restore the wetlands area to a healthy ecosystem.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:54 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Verdi's Operas: A Vigorous Soundtrack To Human Nature

Giuseppe Verdi's operas have an uncanny ability to probe into our contemporary psyche.
Leemage Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 3:09 pm

Two hundred years ago today, in a small northern Italian village, a couple named Verdi — tavern owners by trade — welcomed the birth of a baby boy who would later change the face of opera forever. And, whether we recognize it or not, on the bicentennial of his birth, Giuseppe Verdi is still vital.

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The Record
11:03 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Mala Rodriguez And The Women Of Latin Hip-Hop

Mala Rodriguez on stage at the Mulafest Festival in Madrid in June.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:39 am

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It's All Politics
6:13 pm
Wed October 9, 2013

Shutdown Diary: Paul Ryan's Plan Gets Tea Party Pushback

Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., offered a path forward in the fiscal stalemate, but Tea Party hard-liners weren't impressed.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Are House Republicans still seeking Democratic concessions on the Affordable Care Act? Or have they switched their sights to even bigger targets: federal spending on entitlements like Medicare and Social Security?

The answer on Wednesday depended on which Republican you asked.

Paul Ryan's Pitch

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