NPR Story
3:31 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Dunkin Donuts Returns To Britain

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 6:35 am

The company on Thursday announced a deal for 50 new locations in London, with plans for more in the coming years. Dunkin did have shops in Britain but pulled out in the 1990s.

NPR Story
3:31 am
Fri September 13, 2013

5 Years After Financial Crisis, How's The Job Market Doing?

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 6:00 am

Sunday marks the 5th anniversary of the collapse of one of the nation's leading banking institutions Lehman Brothers. The failure of the bank triggered a global financial crisis and led to the deepest recession in decades. Renee Montagne talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.

NPR Story
3:31 am
Fri September 13, 2013

N.J. Boardwalk Goes Up In Flames

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:01 am

A fire has destroyed eight blocks of boardwalk along the New Jersey shore — an area still recovering from Superstorm Sandy. Four blocks each in Seaside Park and Seaside Heights. The blaze destroyed dozens of boardwalk businesses and caused millions in damages.

NPR Story
3:31 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Are Weapons Getting To Syrian Rebels?

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:13 am

We're going look more closely at whether the United States is providing arms to Syria's rebels. The commander of the Free Syrian Army General told Morning Edition on Thursday that his group was not receiving weapons. But American officials contend they are providing weapons to the rebels.

NPR Story
3:31 am
Fri September 13, 2013

An Unlikely Refuge: Some Wounded Syrians Treated In Israel

A wounded Syrian, suffering skull, stomach and pancreas injuries from an explosion, in intensive care at Ziv Medical Center in Israel. Hospital staff asked that faces and names not be included to protect the safety of the Syrian patients who could get in trouble with Syrian authorities if it were discovered that they were in Israel.
Daniel Estrin For NPR

Originally published on Sun September 15, 2013 9:40 am

At about 2 p.m. on a recent day, hospital personnel at Ziv Medical Center in northern Israel got a text message from the Israeli army: We're on our way with four wounded Syrians. Half an hour later, two army ambulances pulled up to the emergency room.

Two soldiers carried in the injured Syrian, his hands covering his head. Then, another was brought in on a wheelchair.

Teams of army paramedics and hospital doctors huddled around the Syrians, asking their ages, tearing away their clothes and quickly assessing their injuries.

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NPR Story
3:31 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Saudis At Odds With U.S. Over Egypt

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:56 am

Saudi Arabia and other Gulf Arab states are stepping in with billions of dollars for Egypt's military as it attempts to neutralize the Muslim Brotherhood as a political force. The exception is Qatar, which along with Turkey, is left to condemn the ouster of Egypt's Islamist president last month. The rift poses new challenges for U.S. policy in the region.

Science
2:07 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Living Gears Help This Bug Jump

An image from an electron microscope of the back legs of a planthopper insect.
Gregory Sutton

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 12:21 pm

Greg Sutton was closely inspecting the back legs of a planthopper nymph — a small green, flightless insect — when he noticed something odd.

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Environment
2:06 am
Fri September 13, 2013

'Rivers On Rolaids': How Acid Rain Is Changing Waterways

Gwynns Falls runs beneath Interstate 95 at Carroll Park in Baltimore. The chemistry of this river, like many across the country, is changing.
Courtesy of Sujay Kaushal

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 9:47 am

Something peculiar is happening to rivers and streams in large parts of the United States — the water's chemistry is changing. Scientists have found dozens of waterways that are becoming more alkaline. Alkaline is the opposite of acidic — think baking soda or Rolaids.

Research published in the current issue of Environmental Science and Technology shows this trend to be surprisingly widespread, with possibly harmful consequences.

What's especially odd about the finding is its cause: It seems that acid rain actually has been causing waterways to grow more alkaline.

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The Salt
2:05 am
Fri September 13, 2013

The Secret To Making It Through A Yom Kippur Fast? Kreplach

Kreplach, a special Jewish holiday dish that can be made essentially out of leftovers.
Courtesy of Caren Alpert

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 11:11 am

To mark the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, the day of atonement, Jews fast from sundown to sundown. But before the sun sets, friends and family gather to enjoy one final meal. And for the Jews of Eastern Europe, that meal traditionally includes kreplach.

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Shots - Health News
2:03 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Treating Kids' Cancer With Science And A Pocket Full Of Hope

Dr. Jim Olson meets with Carver Faull at Seattle Children's Hospital in August. Carver, now 12, had surgery to remove a brain tumor in 2012.
Matthew Ryan Williams for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 9:02 am

Try to imagine someone who is supremely calm while at the same time bursting with energy, and you've got a pretty good idea of what Jim Olson is like.

He's a cancer researcher, physician, cyclist, kayaker and cook, not always in that order. He approaches each activity with incredible passion.

But to really understand Olson, you have to watch him in action with patients.

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