Business
4:29 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Will Microsoft's Nokia Deal Shake Up Mobile?

Nokia was the only large phone manufacturer in the world to commit to selling phones running Microsoft's operating system. Now Microsoft is buying Nokia's mobile phone business.
Timothy Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 12:30 pm

Nokia was once the largest mobile phone manufacturer in the world, the most valuable company in Europe and an icon in its home base of Finland. But the rise of Apple and Android smartphones knocked the company on its heels.

Now comes news that Microsoft is buying Nokia's mobile phone business for $7.2 billion. NPR's Steve Henn answers some questions about the deal.

So what is Microsoft getting here?

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Politics
4:27 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Rep. Smith On Syria: What Is The Limitation Of U.S. Power?

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 9:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Here's a simple reality of democracy. The president can ask people for support, and if they give it, he's stronger. But they can also say no. That's the reason that presidents have often launched military action without a formal vote in Congress.

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Business
4:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

New York's Dairy Farmers Squeezed By Greek Yogurt Boom

The recent yogurt boom of upstate New York has meant more jobs in places like the Chobani plant in South Edmeston, but it has not led to a bigger dairy herd in the state.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 1:01 pm

Upstate New York has lugged around the Rust Belt identity for decades now.
But today, the region is trying on a new reputation as the king of yogurt — especially the high-protein Greek yogurt that consumers crave.

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Business
4:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Lava Lamp Turns 50

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 9:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. Our last word in business has to be said just the right way. The word is: Groovy. But you have to say it this way - groovy baby.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Groovy...

(LAUGHTER)

MONTAGNE: ...baby. Well, in the '60s, the grooviest thing around was the Lava Lamp. And we're mentioning it just now because it turns 50 today.

INSKEEP: Groovy. The fluorescent lamp, with its hypnotic moving liquid blob center, helped to define the psychedelic era. It first hit stores in Britain on this day in 1963.

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Politics
4:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Obama Meets With McCain, Graham About Syria Strikes

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 9:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

This morning, we're looking at how Members of Congress are responding to President Obama's call for military action in Syria.

INSKEEP: In fact, we can expect to hear many voices in that debate in the coming days on MORNING EDITION.

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Around the Nation
4:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Radio Station KYAY Is Lifeline For Apache Tribe

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 9:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And on a reservation in Arizona, there's a tiny radio station marking its first year on the air. KYAY is owned by the San Carlos Apache Tribe and it's become a window into this isolated reservation, offering news and entertainment. NPR's Kirk Siegler has been listening.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRADITIONAL APACHE SONG)

KIRK SIEGLER: From a cinder block building in a dusty lot on the edge of San Carlos, comes KYAY 91.1 FM, the voice of the San Carlos Apaches.

LYNN KEY: So, you know, it's KYAY.

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Business
4:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Verizon Buys Out Vodafone To Acquire Wireless Company

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 9:54 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR News business news starts with Verizon in total control.

At least for the wireless network. Yesterday, we told you Verizon was on the way to approving one of the biggest deals in the history of the telecommunications business. And now we can tell you the deal is sealed. The company will pay $130 billion in cash and stock to the British company Vodafone to acquire Vodafone's share of their joint wireless venture.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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Middle East
4:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Iran Weighs Heavily In Debate Over Syria

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 9:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

As we've heard, some of the debate over Syria is actually a debate about Syria's ally, Iran. We want to know what Iranian leaders are thinking as the United States contemplates involvement in Syria. And so we've called Scott Peterson, in Istanbul. He's a Christian Science Monitor reporter who's well-known for his coverage of Iran, and author of a book called "Let the Swords Encircle Me," which is about Iran.

Mr. Peterson, welcome to the program.

SCOTT PETERSON: Thank you.

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Sports
4:15 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Nyad Finishes Swimming Goal 35 Years After She First Tried

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 9:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The swimmer Diana Nyad has finally accomplished what no other athlete has ever done. She swam 110 miles from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage and she did it at the age of 64. As Nyad emerged from the Gulf of Mexico yesterday, he tongue swollen from swallowing sea water, she had messages for the crowd that greeted her.

DIANA NYAD: One is we should never ever give up. Two is you're never too old to chase your dreams.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Environment
2:03 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Pollution, Not Rising Temperatures, May Have Melted Alpine Glaciers

The Alps' largest glacier, Aletsch Glacier, extends more than 14 miles and covers more than 46 square miles.
Wikimedia.org

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:28 am

Glaciers in the Alps of Europe pose a scientific mystery. They started melting rapidly back in the 1860s. In a span of about 50 years, some of the biggest glaciers had retreated more than half a mile.

But nobody could explain the glacier's rapid decline. Now, a new study from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory uncovers a possible clue to why the glaciers melted before temperatures started rising: Soot from the Industrial Revolution could have heated up the ice.

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