Shots - Health News
6:07 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

50 Years On, Research On Sex Can Still Be A Lightning Rod

Johnson with her fellow researcher and sometimes husband, William Masters. The pair helped legitimize the study of human sexuality.
AP

The world has changed a lot since a divorced mother of two teamed up with a St. Louis gynecologist to study the physiology of sex.

Masters and Johnson's first book, Human Sexual Response, made Virginia Johnson and William Masters household names in the 1960s. More than any other scientists before them, they approached sex as a biological process to be observed, measured and analyzed.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:01 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:01 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 9:41 am

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
6:01 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 9:41 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be George Alexander Louis' first words? Maz Jobrani.

MAZ JOBRANI: Why is great grandmother always wearing yellow suits? Is she a pimp?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Kyrie O'Connor.

KYRIE O'CONNOR: I didn't say I wanted to be a prince. I said I wanted to be Prince.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Paula Poundstone.

PAULA POUNDSTONE: From this day forth, I should like to be referred to as the infant formally known as Prince.

(LAUGHTER)

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Found Recipes
4:57 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

And The Winning Taste Of Summer Is ...

Some NPR staff members taste recipes from the contest finalists.
Matt Martinez NPR

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 11:01 am

The voting is finished. The taste test is done. The verdict is in: Marti Olesen has won All Things Considered's Taste of Summer contest with her recipe for Diane's Dad's Summer Sandwich.

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Law
4:56 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

After Five Years, Why So Few Charges In Financial Crisis?

Neil Barofsky, special inspector general for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, testifies before Congress about the program in 2010. Barofsky now says of the financial crisis: "The folks responsible for this incredibly painful economic damage that struck our economy have gone free."
Harry Hamburg AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 11:01 am

In the latest in a string of insider trading cases, federal prosecutors this week indicted SAC Capital, one of the most prominent and profitable hedge funds in the world.

But when it comes to the 2008 financial crisis that sent the economy into a tailspin, criminal prosecutions have been few and far between.

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The Two-Way
4:38 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Elite Hacker Barnaby Jack Dies At 36

Barnaby Jack demonstrates an attack on two automated teller machines during the Black Hat technology conference in Las Vegas on July 28, 2010.
Isaac Brekken AP

Barnaby Jack, one of the world's most prominent hackers, died on Friday, the San Francisco Medical Examiner tells NPR's Steve Henn.

As Steve tells our Newscast unit, Jack became a hacker hero when he exploited a security vulnerability in an ATM machine and made it spit out cash.

The move became known as "Jackpotting." Via YouTube, here is the moment from the Black Hat USA 2010 conference (the real action starts at 3:05 and 5:57):

Jack was 36.

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Shots - Health News
4:15 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Hating On Fat People Just Makes Them Fatter

The roots of obesity are complex and include genetics and other factors beyond individual choice, research shows.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 4:48 pm

Don't try to pretend your gibes and judgments of the overweight people in your life are for their own good. Florida researchers have evidence that discriminating against fat people only makes them fatter.

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Around the Nation
4:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Can Software That Predicts Crime Pass Constitutional Muster?

Jeff Brantingham, creator of PredPol, demonstrates computer-generated "predictive policing" zones at the Los Angeles Police Department Unified Command Post in Los Angeles last year.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 11:01 am

Typically, police arrive at the scene of a crime after it occurs. But rather than send cops to yesterday's crime, a new trend in law enforcement is using computers to predict where tomorrow's crimes will be — and then try to head them off.

The software uses past statistics to project where crime is moving. Police in Los Angeles say it's worked well in predicting property crimes there. Now Seattle is about to expand it for use in predicting gun violence.

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Religion
3:59 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Church Invested In Pay Day Loan Companies It Admonished

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 11:01 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. The Church of England's top bishop is in a little hot water. The archbishop of Canterbury is embroiled in a controversy about ethical investment. As NPR's Philip Reeves reports, it involves a company called Wonga.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Let us greet our newly installed archbishop with great gladness.

(APPLAUSE)

PHILIP REEVES, BYLINE: Four months have elapsed since Justin Welby was enthroned as the 105th archbishop of Canterbury.

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