Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez, identified as the gunman who killed five service members at Chattanooga military facilities last week, was suffering from depression, his family says in a statement expressing their "shock, horror, and grief" at the shooting rampage that killed five servicemen.

The statement comes as investigators are reportedly stepping up their investigation into what motivated Abdulazeez, a graduate in engineering from the University of Tennessee, to open fire Thursday on a recruiting center and the Navy Operational Support Center in Chattanooga, Tenn.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump took an ongoing feud with Sen. John McCain to a new level today, mocking the former GOP nominee for having been a prisoner of war and calling him a "loser" for failing to win the White House in 2008.

"He was a war hero because he was captured," Trump said at the 2015 Family Leadership Summit in Ames, Iowa.

"I like people who weren't captured," the current Republican front-runner told political consultant Frank Luntz, who hosted the event.

"He lost and let us down," Trump said. "I've never liked him as much after that."

Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, signaled his all-important approval of a historic nuclear deal forged with the West, but he portrayed the agreement as having been on Tehran's terms.

"Our policy toward the arrogant U.S. government won't change at all," Khamenei said in televised a speech in Tehran marking Eid, the end of Ramadan.

Former Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis, who was forced out of his job as part of a new bailout deal to keep Athens in the euro zone, tells the BBC that the austerity measures that come with the agreement are "going to fail."

The financial reforms, imposed in exchange for an 86 billion euro ($93.6 billion) lifeline will "go down in history as the greatest disaster of macroeconomic management ever," Varoufakis tells the BBC.

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

The U.S. Navy has confirmed that a fifth service member has died of wounds sustained in this week's shooting rampage at two military sites in Chattanooga.

According to a statement released by the Navy Office of Information:

"A male Navy Petty Officer succumbed to wounds received in the July 16 shooting at the Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) in Chattanooga, Tennessee July 18 at 2:17 a.m.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

In the deadliest single attack in a decade in Iraq, a truck bomb exploded at a crowded marketplace in eastern Diyala province, killing at least 115 people celebrating the end of the Muslim Holy month of Ramadan. The self-declared Islamic State reportedly has claimed responsibility.

What happens when you drop a regulation Spalding basketball from a 415-foot-high dam? It depends.

For a group from the trick basketball team How Ridiculous who sank a basket from atop the Gordon Dam in Tasmania, it meant landing a spot in the Guinness World Records book.

Pluto looks to be a far cry from the dead body that many scientists had long presumed. As the New Horizons probe continues to report back from the fringes of the solar system, a word that Mr. Spock might have used sums up the reaction: fascinating.

A year after a Malaysian airliner was shot down over eastern Ukraine by what is widely believed to have been a rebel-operated, Russian made surface-to-air missile, ceremonies were held to remember the 298 people killed in the disaster.

Meanwhile, the Kremlin has rebuffed calls for a United Nations tribunal to prosecute the suspects behind the July 17, 2014, downing of the Boeing 777 en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur.

The German parliament has approved the latest bailout for Greece, voting overwhelmingly for the 86 billion euro ($93.65 billion) package aimed at keeping Athens in the eurozone.

Ahead of the vote in the Bundestag, German Chancellor Angela Merkel warned lawmakers of "predictable chaos" if they failed to OK the deal. The final vote was 439 in favor, 119 opposed and 40 abstentions.

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