Siouxland Public Media Interviews and Features

Weekday mornings at 7:50
  • Hosted by Steve Smith, Mark Munger, Ally Karsyn, and Mary Hartnett

We talk with the people in our community who are making art, news, music, and more. 

Lully Lullay

Dec 31, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Coventry, an English city of 250,00 in the West Midlands, was home to significant industrial power when World War II began, a line of industries Hitler wouldn’t and didn’t miss. When the Battle of Britain began, a specific Coventry blitz started immediately and didn’t end for three long months--198 tons of bombs killed 176 people and injured almost 700.

But the worst was to come. On November 14, 1940, 515 Nazi bombers unloaded on Coventry’s industrial region, leaving the city in ruins. Its own air defenses fired 67 hundred rounds, but brought down only one bomber. It was a rout.

During this time of year, we start to see “Best Books of the Year” lists pop up all over.  Today, I am recommending a book that is already at the top of many of these lists—Little Fires Everywhere, the sophomore novel by Celeste Ng—a complex story that examines the themes of loyalty and betrayal, and at its heart, asks the question “Do the faults of our past determine what we deserve in the future?”

Wikimedia Commons

Okay, it’s time to get serious. Before you talk about miracles and magic, let's have a good cold look at what happened in No Man's Land between British and German troops, December, 1914. Before you grab the Kleenex or get all teary and sentimental, you should remember that perfectly good reasons explain why peace broke out amidst war, why, for one unforgettable Christmas, a battlefield became an enchanted cartoon.

Be reasonable. The magic of that moment is perfectly explainable.

Welcome. Sit. Stay. King.

Dec 22, 2017

King is KWIT/KOJI's featured pet of the week, traveling all the way from Texas. He is a calm, 2-year old Chihuahua, who is looking for a new home and is available for adoption now at the Siouxland Humane Society.

Support for Welcome. Sit. Stay. comes from Priscilla E Forsyth, Attorney at Law, providing immigration law services to the Siouxland community. Legal services in both Spanish and English. For more information, the telephone number is 712-224-2371.

Animal Song of The Week:

Dr. Todd Young helps explain and describe what and what couldn't be the North Star, right here on KWIT.

From everyone at KWIT/KOJI, Merry Christmas!

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Follow your curiosity to the Fred G. Dale Planetarium at Wayne State College.

James C Schaap

Legend has it that back in the fifties, when the county spread blacktop over the gravel on the road straight west to the South Dakota border, one farmer held out. “That cottonwood,” they told him, “is going to have to go before the road goes in. He’s too blasted close to the roadbed. Look there at the way he hangs over.”

Farmer shook his head, said no way. Farmer said he loved that tree, cottonwood or not, tallest one on his place, best shade too; and you know what?-- he could give a fig for that blacktop because who needs the traffic out here anyway?

Welcome. Sit. Stay. Ivy.

Dec 15, 2017

Ivy, our featured pet of the week is a newcomer to Iowa and is looking for a new home, and is available for adoption today from the Siouxland Humane Society!

Support for Welcome. Sit. Stay. comes from Priscilla E Forsyth, Attorney at Law, providing immigration law services to the Siouxland community. Legal services in both Spanish and English. For more information, the telephone number is 712-224-2371.

Animal Song of The Week:

Brutal Metal Beatboxing Dog Song

Happy Friendmas

Dec 14, 2017

Our first annual holiday request show went live on Wednesday, December 13, hosted by Shelby Pierce and Mara Hall.     

Today, I’m recommending Seven Days of Us by Francesa Hornak. Making her fiction debut, Hornak has crafted a witty yet deeply heartfelt work that bestselling author Emily Giffin describes as, “an insightful, character-driven look at the real failures, fumbles, and false starts that define family—and why understanding the people closest to us might be the hardest thing in the world.”

Ames Historical Society

It’s the summer of 1971, on Highway 34, southwest Iowa. Some big digger, a lumbering monster doing the dirt work for road construction--maybe they were going to widen the highway—chewed up ground as such monsters do so well. But it stopped, politely, at the graves of 28 people it found in the way.

You can’t just go charging through. Some kind of recovery had to be done.

One of the men running the show, a man named John Pearson, came home that night after work with the news.

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